MAKE A Viking Longship Draw and - We and Us.

The Longship Company,. After the longest Viking longship portage in history -- from Inyokern, California to her new home in southern Maryland, an overland journey of nearly 3000 miles -- the Sae Hrafn underwent some additional work, and was launched under oars on September 12, 2005. She was found to be as swift as she looks, with stability even better than expected. She was first rigged for.

Viking longship dragon head

In front it had a dragon’s head, and aft a crook, which turned up, and ended with the figure of the dragon’s tail. The carved work on each side of the stem and stern was gilded. This ship the king called the Serpent. When the sails were hoisted they represented, as it were, the dragon’s wings; and the ship was the handsomest in all Norway.” (Saga of Olaf Tryggvason).

Longships presentation 2 - LinkedIn SlideShare.

Royalty-free stock vector ID: 240020623. Viking ship, Drakkar, Langskip, Viking Age Longship with dragon's head realistic vector illustration.Viking ship, Drakkar, Langskip, Viking Age Longship with dragon's head realistic illustration An ancient Scandinavian image of a Viking ship decorated with a dragon head and the inscription Valhalla. Isolated on black, vector illustration An ancient Scandinavian image of a Viking ship decorated with a dragon head.The Viking longship, designed for raiding, could not compete in a world of fortified port cities, organized naval warfare and kings who demanded the pomp and comfort of a cabin when on board. The last naval levy of Viking warships was called out in 1429 and defeated by seven cogs. The dragon had retreated into the realm of legend.


I have made this viking longship which is made of around 960 pieces with Studio. The longships were characterized as a graceful, long, wide and light, with a shallow-draft hull designed for speed. The ship's shallow draft permitted beach landings, while its light weight enabled it to be used bottom-up for shelter in camps. The bow of my ship is decorated with a carved head of a menacing dragon.Viking longships were used in battle, and were long, light, and slender so they could move around quickly. They had a square sail and a mast, but could also be rowed if there was no wind. Depending on its size, a longship had 24 to 50 oars. The prow, at the front of the ship, was often adorned with a dragon or snake head. Small rowing boats were carried on board some larger boats and these.

Viking longship dragon head

Alternative Titles: Viking ship, dragon ship. Longship, also called Viking ship, type of sail-and-oar vessel that predominated in northern European waters for more than 1,500 years and played an important role in history. Ranging from 45 to 75 feet (14 to 23 metres) in length, clinker-built (with overlapped planks), and carrying a single square sail, the longship was exceptionally sturdy in.

Viking longship dragon head

Viking Festival founder Colin Seal (left) with artist Brian Lewis, who painted a gold and copper leaf dragon's head for the event's centrepiece longboat.

Viking longship dragon head

Animal head post from the Oseberg ship burial. In 1904 a remarkable archaeological site was uncovered at Oseberg, Norway. It consisted of an astonishingly well-preserved Viking ship that contained the remains of two women along with a wide array of accompanying grave goods. This vessel, which is widely celebrated as one of the finest finds of the Viking Age, had been buried within a large.

Dragon Head Template - Primary Resources (teacher made).

Viking longship dragon head

The Viking men's shields were tied over the oar holes to protect both men and women during battles. Power The ships were powered by wind in a wool sail or manpower by rowing with oars if there wasn't any wind available. Steering One man would steer the ship by using a big steering oar at the back (stern) of the ship. Room A typical longship would have enough room to fit around 50 - 60 people.

Viking longship dragon head

Aug 17, 2012 - This Pin was discovered by Barbara Johnson. Discover (and save!) your own Pins on Pinterest.

Viking longship dragon head

Illustration about Viking ship, Drakkar, Langskip, Viking Age Longship with dragon's head realistic illustration. Illustration of viking, illustration, newfoundland - 48336533.

Viking longship dragon head

Viking Longships. In 1997, Danish archaeologists discovered a Vikings longship in the mud of Roskilde harbor, 40 kilometers (25 miles) west of Copenhagen. This longship is the largest yet discovered, and it can only be viewed as a lucky coincidence that it was discovered as part of the expansion of the Viking Ship Museum in Roskilde. It is believed that this Viking longship must have been.

Viking longship dragon head

One of the most famous Viking vessels was the longship. It could be up to 75ft in length. This long sailing ship was used for ocean voyages and warfare, and it was shallow enough to row up a river. The longship had an open deck without cabins or benches. The rowers sat on hide-covered sea chests that contained their possessions, weapons and food rations.

BBC - Hands on History: Vikings.

Viking longship dragon head

Drekar, the Viking Longship The historic drekar, or dragon-headed longship, was a stealthy troop carrier powered by sail and muscular oarsmen. Our museum replica, atop included display stand, is cast in quality designer resin to capture every detail and boasts hand-strung rigging, double-dragons, and fine hand-painting. A definitive gift for historians, sailors or anyone who admires the Viking.

Viking longship dragon head

Viking longships often had a dragon’s head carved from wood at the front of the ship, perhaps to scare spirits away. Learn more about Viking History for Kids The Vikings, who were powerful in North Europe from AD 793 until 1066, have captured our imagination for many reasons.

Viking longship dragon head

VIKING MODEL SHIPS HISTORICAL SHIP MODELS The Vikings were the most powerful people in northwestern Europe for nearly five centuries from about AD 800. Their longships were fast and sleek. Powered by sail or oars, they were ideally suited for raiding because their shallow draught meant that they could travel up estuaries and rivers. The Vikings traveled from Norway east to the Black Sea and.